Posters

 

The TEI Conference and DHCS Colloquium will share their poster sessions. Posters will be available on Thursday, October 23, 10:30 – 16:00 in the Rogers Room and surrounding lobbies of the hotel. This is a controlled environment, and presenters will be free to leave their stations at their leisure.  The poster sessions are listed below by alphabetical order of presenter.

DHCS James Coltrain (U. of Nebraska-Lincoln)
AZIMUTH 3D: A Tool for Publishing and Annotating Rich Historical 3D Reconstructions on the Web
Coltrain Abstract

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DHCS Charles Cooney, Clovis Gladstone, Walter Shandruk  (ARTFL, U. of Chicago)
The PhiloLogic4 API and Android PhiloReader Apps
Cooney Gladstone Shandruk Abstract

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DHCS Mary-Louise Craven (York University)
Messages in an Edwardian fonds of postcards:  Rich in information and narrative
Craven Abstract

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TEI James Cummings (University of Oxford)
Adrian S. Wisnicki (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
One Tiny LEAP: A Case Study for Using TEI P5 ODD for Project-Specific Encoding Documentation

The Livingstone-online Enrichment and Access Project (LEAP) benefits from ussing the TEI “ODD” language as a tool for storing project-specific information. This is a powerful and hitherto ignored functionality of ODD. Cummings Wisnicki Abstract

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DHCS Betsy Glade, Sharon Cogdill, and David Robinson (St.Cloud State University)
Humanists and Hierarchy: Learning How to Construct Student/Faculty Teams for Digital Projects|
Glade Cogdill Robinson Abstract

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DHCS Jonathan Greenberg (RILM)
Music history in the present: Publishing music encyclopedias on the Web with TEI

To create an online version of the scholarly music encyclopedia Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart, RILM decided to mark up the entire text in TEI and make it available to authors and editors for revision and further markup. The markup and editorial platform must strike a balance between the flexibility of TEI and the abilities of the authors and editors of the publication.

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TEI Kiyonori Nagasaki (International Institute for Digital Humanities/University of Tokyo)
Ikki Ohmukai (National institute of Informatics)
Masahiro Shimoda (University of Tokyo)
An Attempt at Crowd-sourced Transcription in Japan

The retrodigitization of older and not so old Japanese books by OCR does not work well. Efforts are underway to use a combination of manual transcription and algorithmic procedures to create effective crowdsourcing workflows. Kiyonori Ohmukai Shimoda Abstract

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DHCS  J.R. Ladd (Washington U. in St.Louis)
Named-Entity Recognition and the Collaborative Networks Revealed by Dedications in the EEBO-TCP corpus
Ladd Abstract

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TEI Eva Nyström, Patrik Granholm (Uppsala University)
Greek manuscripts in Sweden

36,000 pages from 120 Greek manuscripts, mainly from the Byzantine world, will be catalogued and digitized, using the TEI manuscript description module. Nystroem Granholm Abstract

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TEI William Faulkner Dorner (University of Central Florida)
Poetic Analysis Using TEI and XSL

Beresford’s 1794 translation of the Aeneid is annotated with the help of TEI and XSL in order to isolate and interpret various poetic figures of speech, sound, and thought. Dorner Abstract

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TEI Magdalena Turska (University of Oxford)
Corpus of Ioannes Dantiscus’ Texts & Correspondence

Johannes Dantiscus, a Polish bishop and diplomat of the early 16th century, was a  prolific writer of letters (6,000 in all. Their publication as a digital corpus throws much light on the Central and Eastern Europe of his day. Turska Abstract

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TEI Nigel Austin Leplanka (Texas A&M University)
H.G. Wells’ Floor Games and Little Wars: Encoding Games And Their Rules

How do you encode the rules for games–a genre in its own right–or whimsical ways of playing with such rules, as H. G. Wells did in Floor Games and Little Wars? Leplanka Abstract

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TEI Anne Katrin Lorenz  and Roland S. Kamzelak(German Literature Archive, Marburg)
Epistolary Networks: Visualising multi-dimensional information structures in correspondence corpora

The correspondence of German exiles during 1932-50 is used to explore  their complex relationships, taking advantage of advanced methods of information technology and open standards like XML/TEI. Lorenz Kamzelak Abstract

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TEI Jim McGrath (Northeastern University
Digital Humanities Quarterly: A Case Study in Bibliographic Development

The citation network of the DH community is fruitfully explored by a centralized bibliography of material cited by the contributors to DHQ, the discipline’s flagship journal.  Mcgrath Abstract

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DHCS Mary Zimmer (Boston U.)  and Douglas Duhaime (Notre Dame)
From search to serendipity: computational approaches to intertextuality in the work of Geoffrey Hill
Zimmer Duhaime Abstract

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